Our Cars

2018 Peugeot 2008 Allure Review Long-Term Update

How suited is the Peugeot 2008 Allure to the demands of town and country life with a family. We aim to find out.

What are we testing? The 2018 Peugeot 2008 Allure

Who’s running it? Isaac Bober

Why are we testing it? To find out why Aussies aren’t buying this well-kitted, good looking and capable little SUV.

What it needs to do? While we’ve got the 2008 we want to find out if it’s the real deal when it comes to the active family; needs to be able to handle the school run, trips into the Big Smoke and country adventures.

This week it’s about the little things that annoy most about the 2008. And these are the back windscreen…it seems to be tinted and at night time it’s almost impossible to see out of. And don’t say, because it’s dark; that’s not what I mean.

Rather, that in the evening (before it’s become totally dark), when a car burns up behind you it’s lights tend to dazzle and all sense of depth perception goes. This makes it hard to tell how close the car actually is to you. Hmm.

And then there’s the transmission which defaults to second-gear…all the time. In most situations, it’s fine, but the corner at the end of my street is up a hill and we tend to turn right up it. It’s reasonably steep. So, you put your foot down and the car, in second gear, will just creep into the intersection, even if you’ve got your foot pinned to the floor and screaming at it to ‘get a (bleeping) move on’. It will jump limp through the intersection and you with your heart in your mouth…

Then once you finish taking the corner literally at a snails pace the car will burst into life as if the computer has worked out the thing is close to stalling and that first-gear was necessary after all. Very odd. A similar thing happens the Toyota HiLux, and on the same corner, you’ll give it some gas to get going, the back wheels will break traction and then the traction control will kill everything and you’ll be left in this rolling no-man’s land until TC releases its grip and normal programming is resumed.

That’s it for now. Next I’ll look into the 2008’s active safety features and finally get that Grip Control video sorted out.


Isaac Bober

Isaac Bober

Isaac Bober was born in the shadow of Mount Panorama in Bathurst and, so, it was inevitable he’d fall into work as a motoring writer. He began his motoring career in 2000 reviewing commercial vehicles, before becoming editor of Caravan & Motorhome magazine. He then moved to MOTOR Magazine before going freelance and contributing to Overlander 4WD, 4×4 Australia, TopGear Australia, Men’s Health, Men’s Fitness, The Australian, CARSguide, and many more.