Car News

Entry-level Hyundai i30 Go launches from $19,990+ORC

Hyundai Go launched at less than $20k as Hyundai attempts to cash in on i30 accolades.

THE HYUNDAI I30 has a new family member, the entry-level Go variant which lists from $19,990+ORC in manual petrol form. The i30 Go gets the same safety features as the previous entry point, the Active.

Available with either a six-speed manual or automatic in petrol trim (120kW), or a six-speed manual or seven-speed DCT in diesel form (100kW), the i30 Go seven airbags, tyre pressure monitoring system, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility, 8in touchscreen, reversing camera, LED daytime running lights, and automatic headlights.

The i30 Go doesn’t get native sat-nav, unlike the rest of the i30 range and, instead, gets a similar smartphone only set-up like the Hyundai Kona. Customers with a compatible smartphone will be able to use Apple Maps or Google Maps via the in-dash multimedia touchscreen, make phone calls, play music or podcasts, compose text messages, and more.

Hyundai i30 Go key features:

i30 Go  

7 airbags

Full size spare wheel

Cruise control

Electronic Stability Control (ESC)

16″ steel wheels

Height adjustable driver’s seat

Vehicle Stability Management (VSM)

Tyre Pressure Monitoring System

Tilt & telescopic steering column

Hill-start Assist Control (HAC)

8″ touchscreen radio system

Hyundai Auto Link

Auto dusk sensing headlights

Apple CarPlay compatibility

Front & rear power windows (with driver’s one touch auto down)

LED Daytime Running Lights (DRL)

Android Auto compatibility

Rear view camera

Bluetooth connectivity

 

Hyundai i30 pricing:

Engine

Transmission

Go

Active

SR

SR Premium

Elite

Premium

2.0 GDi

6 speed manual

$19,990

$20,950

6 speed automatic

$22,290

$23,250

1.6 CRDi

6 speed manual

$22,490

$23,450

7 speed DCT

$24,990

$25,950

$28,950

$33,950

1.6 T-GDi

6 speed manual

$25,950

7 speed DCT

$28,950

$33,950

Question: Do you think a value-oriented i30 will win more buyers to the model?


  • John John

    I think the Go will work to Hyundai’s advantage in both directions – for price buyers who can’t or won’t pay the extra for the Active, and for value buyers who look at the relatively small price increase of the Active over the Go and think the extra money is well spent.

    Myself, I’d still go for the Active over the Go – there’s very little money in it (though that might change as I expect the Go might be the target of future price reductions or special deals where the Active might not be).

  • Azmodan

    Geez why waste good money on a new car. Get a 1 year old i30 premium at a substantial price discount.

  • Three Pedals Only

    Your question: “Do You Think A Value-Oriented I30 Will Win More Buyers To The Model?”

    The i30 Go is under the ‘magic’ $20,000 (+ORC) (in manual form), in auto form it is $22,290 (+ORC). Not surprising a Toyota Ascent (auto) is $22,230 (+ORC). So in future we will be seeing many i30 Go’s in hire garb sitting beside Toyota Ascents also in hire garb, parked behind those airport chain-wire fences.

    In answer to your question; for winning more fleet buyers (for the 130 Go) – yes but, does it win this buyer to i30 models – no.

    I feel that the release of the i30 PD model range has been carried out in an ad-hoc manner: #1) offering a ‘safety suite’ option six months after those models suitable for such option have been released and purchased by some (retro-fitting anyone?); and #2) many months after the i30’s release only recently has a full sized spare been made available as an option (obtaining the full sized spare as a nil cost inclusion – through haggling with the dealer – can only happen if the item is available at the time of purchasing the vehicle).

    I’ll be waiting at least six months to see what else Hyundai ‘pulls out of the hat’ and what effect the upcoming introduction of ‘ANCAP 2018’ has on the safety ratings of the current (2017) standard safety specification deficiencies of the Hyundai i30 SR manual before deciding whether or not to purchase said vehicle.

    Also within that time-frame the new Mazda 3 and the new Suzuki Swift Sport would be released – or about to be.

Isaac Bober

Isaac Bober

Isaac Bober was born in the shadow of Mount Panorama in Bathurst and, so, it was inevitable he’d fall into work as a motoring writer. He began his motoring career in 2000 reviewing commercial vehicles, before becoming editor of Caravan & Motorhome magazine. He then moved to MOTOR Magazine before going freelance and contributing to Overlander 4WD, 4×4 Australia, TopGear Australia, Men’s Health, Men’s Fitness, The Australian, CARSguide, and many more.