Car News

2017 Honda Civic Type R arrives in Australia

The 2017 Honda Civic Type R has arrived back in Australia after a six-year absence, with the first shipment arriving in Melbourne over the weekend.

THE HONDA CIVIC TYPE R will launch here in October with the first shipment of vehicles arriving into Melbourne over the weekend. Fittingly, the first vehicle to drive off the ship at Port of Melbourne’s Webb Dock facility was a Rally Red example, which is earmarked to serve as a media evaluation vehicle over the coming months.

Honda said, “It was followed by around 60 customer cars that will soon be on their way to Honda dealerships across Victoria, South Australia and the Northern Territory, before being delivered to their new owners”.

Honda Australia is expecting more than 400 vehicles before the end of the year.

“The ultimate in Civic performance and a direct manifestation of Honda’s racing spirit, experience and heritage, the Type R stands as a banner of Honda’s commitment to creating products that put customers – and enthusiasts – at the centre of everything it does,” said Honda Australia Director, Stephen Collins.

“Since the Civic Type R prototype was unveiled at the Paris Motor Show last year, the anticipation surrounding Honda’s next-generation high-performance hot hatch has continued to build, so it’s incredibly exciting to have the first cars here now and it won’t be long until we’ll start to see them out on the road.

“The arrival of the all-new Civic Type R is the culmination of 18 months of intense new product activity for Honda Australia that has seen our entire line-up of vehicles either refreshed, updated or all-new models introduced to market.”

Locally, the new Honda Civic Type R is available in a single specification, priced at $50,990+ORC. Standard equipment for Australia includes adaptive dampers with three driving modes, Brembo brake package, 20-inch alloy wheels, the full Honda Sensing suite of safety and driver-assist technologies.

Practical Motoring test drove the new Honda Civic Type R at its international launch, read our first drive review here.


  • Peter Bryan

    $51,000 Before ORC . Can remember when the Honda Civic was a peoples car to rival the mini itself a peoples {Workers car} .

    • Monty

      The Type R is not exactly the bread and butter version! The early Honda cars were brilliant but they’ve lost the plot over the last few years. Maybe this will get them back on track.

  • McF1

    Looking forward to seeing the Honda Civic Type R in the showroom.
    I am a fan of it’s looks. It’s great to see a car that wears it’s heart on it’s sleeve.
    It is terrific that Honda has provided it with “..the full Honda Sensing suite of safety and driver-assist technologies..”.
    It would be good if the standard Civic tank of 47 litres was larger for the Type R. For the VW Golf R the tank size is increased from the standard 50 litres to 55 litres.
    The Type R only comes with a tyre repair kit, rather than a space saver spare, which is annoying.

    The performance of the Type R is very interesting. It is reasonable quick from 0 to 100km/hr, but it’s when it’s moving that it really shines as indicated by the review attached to this article. That is why it is so good around the ring;
    “….But turbo lag means that if you suddenly floor it at 2500rpm, you don’t get much of anything. things start to get truly lively above around 3500rpm, but even beyond 4000rpm there’s still a slight delay. Once charging though it really does fly, careering at the redline without let-up or hindrance….”.

    The on the move performance of the Type R is demonstrated by “CarWow” with their current “RS 3 v A45 AMG v Civic Type R v Golf R v Focus RS – DRAG & ROLLING RACE | Head-to-Head” You Tube test. The Type R with initial lag is able to beat the Golf R and Focus RS with the rolling start!!

Isaac Bober

Isaac Bober

Isaac Bober was born in the shadow of Mount Panorama in Bathurst and, so, it was inevitable he’d fall into work as a motoring writer. He began his motoring career in 2000 reviewing commercial vehicles, before becoming editor of Caravan & Motorhome magazine. He then moved to MOTOR Magazine before going freelance and contributing to Overlander 4WD, 4×4 Australia, TopGear Australia, Men’s Health, Men’s Fitness, The Australian, CARSguide, and many more.