Car News

2016 Toyota Hilux – all the details you need to know

Toyota have released the new Hilux, and it’s way more than just a facelift.

UPDATE: check out our on and offroad test of the 2017 Hilux.

Models

There’s three grades – Workmate, SR, and SR5.  The body styles are single cab, extra cab and double cab.  There’s 4X2, 4X4 and 4X2 High Rider which is a 4X4 but without the transfer case and the other four wheel drive hardware.  Overall, there’s 31 different combinations, up from 23 in the previous model.

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Engines & transmission

Lots of choice here.  In some cases, the engines are tuned slightly differently depending on whether it is a Hi-Rider/4X4 or automatic or manual:

  • 2.7L 4 cylinder petrol – 122kW @ 5200rpm, 245Nm @ 4000rpm
  • 4.0L V6 petrol – 175kW @ 5200rpm, 376Nm @ 3800rpm
  • 2.4L 4 cylinder diesel – 110kW @ 3400rpm, 343Nm @ 1400-2800rpm (4X2), 400Nm @ 1600-2000rpm (4X4)
  • 2.8L 4 cylinder diesel
    • 125kW @ 3600rpm 343Nm @ 1200-3400rpm (4X2) 
    • 130kW @ 3400rpm (Hi-Rider, 4X4).   450Nm @ 1600-2400rpm (auto & Hi-Rider 4X4), 420Nm @ 1400-2600rpm (manual, Hi-Rider & 4X4)

As usual these days, the engine outputs aren’t massively increased as most of the effort has to go in to meeting emissions standards, which tends to mean compromises in power and torque.  That means you have to work hard just to keep the same engine outputs.

Toyota say that the on the V6, fuel economy and emissions performance have improved to 11.5 litres/100km on 4×2 variant, down from 11.7-11.8 litres/100km.  The 4×4 double cab at is 12 litres/100km, previously 13.

The transmissions are six-speed manual and auto, except for the pov-pack 4X2 which still gets a 5-speed manual.  The manual gear lever is closer to driver and has a shorter throw.

The six-speed automatic and manual transmissions have a wider spread of ratios than the four and five-speed transmissions they supersede.  The first-gear ratio by is lower up to 28 per cent in automatic models and by 10 per cent in manual models.   Top-gear ratios have been raised by up to 22 per cent in automatic models and 23 per cent in manual models.

The 6-speed manual is now “inteligent” which means it will match engine revs to the gear selected.  The automatic now blips on downshift too, because you need that in a ute.  Of more use is downshift control which times downshifts to maximise fuel economy, and Close Control which maintains the current gear when you quickly hit the accelerator, even before pedal hits the floor as in a normal kickdown.

800_15HiLux_42

A drive mode switch allows the driver to choose between drive characteristics that favour economical driving or maximum throttle response, standard on all models except manual Workmate single and extra cabs.

In ECO mode, the electronic throttle curve is changed and air-conditioner load reduced.  POWER mode provides sharper acceleration response for more agile driving on hills and winding roads, but there’s no extra power.  Typically, these eco modes make no difference at all, but I guess you feel better.

In 4×4 models, a dial is used to engage four-wheel-drive, sadly replacing the transfer lever.

Brakes, steering & suspension

Brakes have been improved too with larger boosters across the range.  Drums are still on the rear, but the front discs are larger – 319mm from 297 on 4X4/Hi-Rider for example.

The rear suspension is still leaf, no coil option, and Toyota claim it’s ideal for load carrying and towing for some reason.  Anyway, the leaves are are 100mm longer (now 1400mm) and mounted wider apart – Toyota claim “SUV-style ride comfort” but we suspect that’s a dream.  The attachment point of the rear suspension to the frame has been moved 100mm forward and 25mm lower.  These change improve steering response and stability when the vehicle is cornering, especially when loaded.

Steering torque (effort) on 4×4 models has been reduced by 13 per cent at low speeds and six per cent at high speeds. There are 3.43 turns lock to lock on Hi-Rider and 4×4 models, 3.82 on 2WD and 3.30 on 4×4 single cab.

For HiLux 4×2 variants, steering feel is approximately 6% lighter, done to reduce to reduce driver fatigue, especially on long drives. There are however no active safety features like lane departure warning.

carrying capacity & towing

Hilux can now tow 3500kg…if it’s a manual 2.8L 4X4.  Only 3200k for the auto 2.8s, and less elsewhere (see table at the end).

Whether that is a real 3500kg remains to be seen (details here and here).  Now standard is trailer sway assist, which detects trailer sway and individually brakes the front wheels to cancel it out.

All Hiluxes have a payload greater than 1000kg except for the 4X4 dualcabs, which are around 925kg, not bad for a double cab.

Toyota say the tub is stronger with a revised deck structure that incorporates extra ribbing and reinforcements, plus a reinforced header board, thicker outer panels and steel-plate brackets on tailgate struts.

Refinement & safety

Aircon is now standard!  Toyota have worked on NVH (noise, vibration and harshness), added cruise control, improved the seats, added more power options like windows and mirrors, touch-screens move further down the range and so on.  SR and SR5 get carpet and a cooler box, and SR5 can have a power driver’s seat.

The new Hilux has achieved a 5-star safety rating with 34.55 out of 37, applicable to all models.  Toyota have included a reversing camera on all utes  and offer an accessory camera on cab-chassis models.

An interesting development is that the rear seat base in doublecab SR and SR5 variants is now split 60/40 with a stowable armrest.  That’s very unusual for a ute, and a good move.  Also good news is that there’s more than a dozen different compartments.

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There is a greater range of seat-height adjustment and, on all but 4×2 single cabs, telescopic as well as tilt adjustment for the steering column.  Take that, Ranger!

Rear-seat occupants have more knee clearance, double cabs have a top-tether anchor and two ISOFIX child-restraint anchors, a rarity in dual cab utes, and not even all cars like peoplemoves have them.

All models have a 12-volt socket (pity there’s not more than one)…but you’re lucky in the SR5 as it has two, and SR5 double cabs also gain a 220V accessory socket, again like the Ranger.

Offroad

There’s traction control, as before, but it would be reasonable to expect improved calibration and effectiveness this time round as it’s less of an afterthought.  Toyota also say that the “Toyota’s local engineers [ have been undertaking ] an unprecedented six-year program that delivered a new rugged suspension package, enhanced underbody protection, and electronic control systems tuned for more effective operation on gravel and during off-road driving.”

Automatic SR5 4×4 models have downhill assist control  (hill descent control) to moderate vehicle speed on steep off-road descents.  These model versions are excellent, and if it’s like previous Toyota efforts it’ll be well worth having.

Rear-wheel articulation is 520mm on both sides of the vehicle (previously 433mm on the left and 474mm on the right)….Hilux trivia right there!   A rear differential lock is standard on 4×4 SR and SR5.   Aapproach and departure angles have been improved on most pick-ups. Ground clearance is 225mm.

The shock absorbers were previously rear-facing and located behind the axle, but are now forward-facing and located in front of the axle, to improve straight-line stability – this will make them more prone to stone damage, but I suppose all that testing probably proved it’s not the problem it seems at first glance.

Toyota say  the locally developed underbody protection is 40 per cent thicker and 30 per cent larger to provide three times greater resistance to deformation.

An interesting and welcome change is that all 4×4 and Hi-Rider models have a purpose-designed fuse box in the engine bay to allow safe connection of accessories to the vehicle’s power supply.

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Analysis

Hilux isn’t going to win the power war, but the sheer number of variants and engines will mean there’s one for everyone.  It looks like everything has been addressed – improved on and offroad capability, efficiency, more accessories, safety and refinement.  Will this ute be more than the sum of its parts?  Watch this space, we’ll be testing one soon.

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Specification walkthrough

All Hiluxes have:

  • Air-conditioning
  • Cruise control
    Power windows & mirrors, central locking
  • Seven airbags (previously two on 4×2, six on 4×4)
    Reversing camera (pick-ups – previously SR5 only) Accessory camera available for cab-chassis variants
  • Vehicle stability control, Active traction control, Trailer sway control, Hill-start assist control (automatic hold on a hill)
  • Anti-skid brakes with BA and EBD
  • Seatbelt warning reminder (all front seats, rear of double cabs)
  • Tilt-and-telescopic steering column adjustment (except 4×2 single cabs)
  • Daytime running lamps (halogen – Workmate, SR; LED – SR5)
  • 80-litre fuel tank
  • Headlamp levelling
  • Display audio – AM/FM, CD, Bluetooth®#, voice recognition, steering-wheel controls

Workmate-specific features

  • Fabric seat trim, Vinyl floor covering
  • 16-inch steel wheels (4×2), 17-inch steel wheels with all-terrain tyres (4×4)
    Manual air-conditioning
    6.1-inch display audio screen, two speakers
  • Bluetooth® connectivity
  • Voice recognition
  • Audio, phone controls on steering wheel
  • Auto up/down – driver’s window

SR (over and above Workmate)

  • Black side steps (Hi-Rider, 4×4) Chrome exterior door handles, B-pillar black-out paint
    Floor carpet, Premium fabric seat trim
  • Air-conditioned cooler/heater box
  • Seven-inch display audio screen
  • Four speakers (EC); six speakers (DC)
  • Toyota Link^
  • Multi-information display (monochrome)
  • 60/40 split-fold rear seat base (doublecab)
  • Rear differential lock (4×4)
  • Vertical seat-height adjustment

SR5 (over and above SR)

  • 18-inch alloy wheels
  • Intelligent manual transmission (turbo-diesel SR5)
  • Premium shift knob and steering wheel
  • Auto-levelling LED headlamps, LED daytime running lamps, Fog lamps
  • Stainless-steel sports bar
  • Smart entry and start
  • Chrome power-retractable exterior mirrors
  • Privacy glass
  • Chrome radiator grille, Chrome rear step
  • Climate-control air-conditioning
  • Auto up/down – all windows
  • Adjustable intermittent wipers
  • Satellite navigati on,Toyota Link added features
  • 4.2-inch thin-film transistor colour MID
  • Additional 12V socket, 220V accessory socket
  • Alarm
  • Downhill Assist Control (4×4 SR5 auto)
  • Option: Leather-accented trim, power driver’s seat (4×4 SR5 double cab diesel)

The SR looks to be the pick of the bunch for offroading at least – you’d want to ditch the 18″ rims for offroading and stick with the 17s.  There’s bling elsehwere, and you get the rear locker on the SR as well as the 60/40 rear seat split .  The extra 12v socket you could wire in easily enough, and these days Google Maps beats any car satnav.

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2016 Toyota Hilux Specifications

There’s 31 different combinations of Hilux, so there’s a lot of specs:

Dimensions & capacities

Length (pick-ups)

5330mm

Width (pick-ups)

1800mm (4×2); 1855mm (Hi-Rider, 4×4)

Height

1690mm – 4×2 SC
1695mm – 4×2 EC
1700mm – 4×2 DC
1795mm – 4×4 SC
1810mm – 4×4 EC
1815mm – Hi-Rider, 4×4 DC

Wheelbase

3085mm

Front/rear tracks

1510/1510mm – 4×2
1495/1510mm – 4×4 SC
1535/1550mm – Hi-Rider, 4×4 EC & DC

Kerb weight

1475-1840kg (4×2); 1930kg (Hi-Rider); 1775-2080kg (4×4)

GVM

2700-2860kg (4×2); 2930kg (Hi-Rider); 3000-3050kg (4×4)

Approach angle

31 degrees (EC, DC pick-ups; SC – 30 deg.)

Departure angle

26 degrees (EC, DC pick-ups; SC – 25 deg.)

Ground clearance

279mm (4×4 EC & DC pick-ups)

Wading depth

700mm

Towing unbraked#

750kg

Towing braked#

4×2: 2500kg; Hi-Rider: 2800kg
4×4: 3000kg (2GD 6AT, 1GR); 3200kg (2GD 6MT, 1GD 6AT); 3500kg (1GD 6MT)

Fuel tank

80 litres

Engines

ENGINE TYPE

2GD-FTV 2.4L turbo-diesel (4 cylinder)

Compression ratio

15.6:1

Fuel system

Common-rail

Maximum power

110kW @ 3400rpm

Maximum torque

343Nm@1400-2800rpm (4×2)
400Nm@1600-2000rpm (4×4)

FUEL ECONOMY* – 2GD-FTV engine (4×2 Workmate)

Model

4×2 Single Cab

4×2 Double Cab

Transmission

5MT (R151)

5MT (R151)

Combined: litres/100km

7.7

7.1

Urban: litres/100km

8.8

8.7

Extra urban: litres/100km

7.1

6.1

Emissions: grams/km

203

186

FUEL ECONOMY* – 2GD-FTV engine (4×4 Workmate)

Model

Single Cab

Extra Cab

Double Cab

Transmission

6MT (RC60)

6AT (AC60)

6MT (RC60)

6MT (RC60)

6AT (AC60)

Combined: litres/100km

7.7

8.5

7.7

7.3

8.3

Urban: litres/100km

8.8

10.3

8.8

8.8

10.6

Extra urban: litres/100km

7.0

7.4

7.0

6.4

7.0

Emissions: grams/km

203

224

203

191

219

ENGINE TYPE

1GD-FTV 2.8L turbo-diesel

Cylinders

4-cyl, in-line

Compression ratio

15.6:1

Fuel system

Common-rail

Cetane number

48

Maximum power

125kW @ 3600rpm (4×2)
130kW @ 3400rpm (Hi-Rider, 4×4)

Maximum torque

343Nm @ 1200-3400rpm (4×2)
450Nm @ 1600-2400rpm (6AT – Hi-Rider, 4×4)
420Nm @ 1400-2600rpm (6MT – Hi-Rider, 4×4)

FUEL ECONOMY* – 1GD-FTV engine (4×2)

Model

Single

Extra

Double Cab

Grade

SR

SR

SR

SR5

Transmission

5MT (R151)

5MT (R151)

6MT (RC61)

6AT (AC60)

6MT (RC61)

Combined: litres/100km

8.0

7.3

7.3

8.1

7.3

Urban: litres/100km

9.4

9.2

9.0

10.4

9.0

Extra urban: litres/100km

7.1

6.2

6.4

6.8

6.4

Emissions: grams/km

210

193

193

213

193

FUEL ECONOMY* – 1GD-FTV engine (4×4)

Model

Single Cab

Extra

Double Cab

Grade

SR Cab Chassis

SR, SR5 Pick-ups

SR 
Cab Chassis

SR, SR5 
Pick-ups

Transmission

6MT RC61

6AT AC60

6MT RC61

6MT RC61

6AT AC60

6MT RC61

6AT AC60

Combined: litres/100km

8.1

9.0

7.6

8.1

9.0

7.6

8.5

Urban: litres/100km

9.3

10.9

9.2

9.3

10.9

9.2

10.9

Extra urban: litres/100km

7.4

7.8

6.7

7.4

7.8

6.7

7.1

Emissions: grams/km

212

236

201

212

236

201

223

ENGINE TYPE

2TR-FE 2.7L petrol

Cylinders

4-cyl, in-line

Compression ratio

10.2:1

Fuel system

EFI

RON

91 or higher

Maximum power

122kW @ 5200rpm

Maximum torque

245Nm @ 4000rpm

FUEL ECONOMY* – 2TR-FE engine

Model

4×2 Single Cab Workmate

4×2 Double Cab Workmate

Transmission

5MT (R151)

6AT (AC60)

5MT (151)

6AT (AC60)

Combined: litres/100km

11.1

10.9

10.7

10.4

Urban: litres/100km

14.0

13.1

14.0

13.4

Extra urban: litres/100km

9.4

9.6

8.7

8.6

Emissions: grams/km

259

252

248

241

ENGINE TYPE

1GR-FE petrol V6 4.0

Cylinders

Six cylinders, 60-degree V formation

Valve mechanism

24V DOHC with VVT-i

Compression ratio

10.0:1

Fuel system

Electronic controlled sequential port fuel-injection

RON

95 or higher

Maximum power

175kW @ 5200rpm

Maximum torque

376Nm @ 3800rpm

FUEL ECONOMY* – 1GR-FE engine

Model

4×2 Double Cab

4×4 Double Cab

4×4 Double Cab

Grade

SR Pick-up

SR Pick-up

SR5 Pick-up

Transmission

AC60

Combined: litres/100km

11.5

12.0

Urban: litres/100km

16.0

16.4

Extra urban: litres/100km

8.9

9.4

Emissions: grams/km

267

277

Pricing & Payload

How much does it cost – prices exclusive of onroad costs. “New” is a new model.

4X2 Single Cab (cab chassis)

 Towing

PayloadPrice (exclusive of onroad costs)

Workmate, 2.7 P, man

2500kg

1225kg

$20,990

Workmate, 2.7 P, auto

2500kg

1210kg

$22,990

Workmate, 2.4 TD, man

2500kg

1240kg

$24,990

SR, 2.8 TD, man

2500kg

1235kg

$28,490

4×2 Extra Cab (pick-up)

 

 

 

SR, 2.8 TD, man

2500kg

1040kg

$35,490

4×2 Double Cab (pick-up)

 

 

 

Workmate, 2.7 P, man

2500kg

1035kg

$30,690

Workmate, 2.7 P, auto

2500kg

1025kg

$32,690

Workmate, 2.4 TD, man

2500kg

1020kg

$33,990

SR, 4.0 P, auto

2500kg

1015kg

$41,990

Hi-Rider SR, 2.8 TD, man

2800kg

1000kg

$39,990 (new)

Hi-Rider SR, 2.8 TD, auto

2800kg

1000kg

$41,990 (new)

Hi-Rider SR5, 2.8 TD, man

2800kg

1000kg

$47,990 (new)

4×4 Single Cab (cab chassis)

 

 

 

Workmate, 2.4 TD, man

3200kg

1225kg

$36,990 (new)

Workmate, 2.4 TD, auto

3000kg

1225kg

$38,990 (new)

SR, 2.8 TD, man

3500kg

1205kg

$39,490

SR, 2.8 TD, auto

3200kg

1205kg

$41,490

4×4 Extra Cab (cab chassis)

 

 

 

Workmate, 2.4 TD, man

3200kg

1120kg

$40,490

 

 

 

 

4×4 Extra Cab (pick-up)

 

 

 

SR, 2.8 TD, man

3500kg

1005kg

$44,490

SR5, 2.8 TD, man

3500kg

1010kg

$51,990

4×4 Double Cab (cab chassis)

 

 

SR, 2.8 TD, man

3500kg

1045kg

$44,990

SR, 2.8 TD, auto

3200kg

1045kg

$46,990

4×4 Double Cab (pick-up)

 

 

 

Workmate, 2.4 TD, man

3200kg

955kg

$43,990 (new)

Workmate, 2.4 TD, auto

3000kg

955kg

$45,990 (new)

SR, 4.0 P, auto

3000kg

1000kg

$48,490 (new)

SR, 2.8 TD, man

3500kg

920kg

$46,490

SR, 2.8 TD, auto

3200kg

920kg

$48,490

SR5, 4.0 P, auto

3000kg

1000kg

$55,990

SR5, 2.8 TD, man

3500kg

925kg

$53,990

SR5, 2.8 TD, auto

3200kg

925kg

$55,990

SR5+, 2.8 TD, man

3500kg

925kg

$55,990

SR5+, 2.8 TD, auto

3200kg

925kg

$57,990

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  • Re Pete

    Shattered . No extra cab auto ! Let alone V6 . ( excuse was given to me that they didn’t sell , but they don’t remember that no one wants an extra cab without suicide doors !!

  • Brian Holt

    Motors are listed to include 4L petrol but specs only list 3LV6. Is that a typo?

    • Yes, Brian. Sorry about that. The main copy listed it as a 4.0L V6 but the specs box stated 3.0L. This is fixed now. Cheers Isaac

      • Brian Holt

        Thanks Isaac
        I’d also like to say that my 2005 dual cab 4×4 Hilux 4L petrol tows a moderately heavy trailer constantly and gives me around 14 to 15L/100 for conservative urban driving. That’s around the old 20 mpg. I’m happy with that, as it is a smooth, reliable motor that has the ability to accelerate out of harm’s way when needed. It’s also very cheap as far as maintenance goes. I’ve had it for 10 years and it’s as good as new. I’d recommend the v6 to anyone who is not a lead foot and wants quiet smooth reliable power with low maintenance. I regard diesels as chitty chitty bang bangs which stink and may cost a lot in the long term

        • chris

          Also have a 4.0 V6 4×4 in a extra cab,bought new in 2005,love the smooth power,its at its best on the highway where it powers up hills with out having to drop back gears at all,its a very strong reliable motor which are known to do over 500,000klms untouched,just regular servicing.I will take the extra fuel cost over the ticking time bomb a common rail diesel can be,don’t get me wrong,the modern diesel punches well above its weight but one bad tank of fuel can spell doom.anyway the fuel use is not as bad as some bloggers report and the RPM @ 110kph sits around 2200RPM not 3500RPM as some turkey suggests.
          Its a pitty Toyota are not offering the 4.0L in the new extra cab or as a manual,not that I am even contemplating selling my 05.I realy prefer the instant response of a large 6 or 8 cyl natruly aspirated engine any day.

  • Darren

    I’d like to see tub dimensions listed in with the other specs.

  • Karl

    The tank capacity on my SR5 is 60 litres and not 80 litres as quoted. This makes a tremendous difference in extra trips to the servo as you are only getting just over 600km’s to a tank.

    • Hi Karl, thanks for letting us know that. Australian-spec models get an 80L fuel tank.

  • Michael Pran

    LED headlight fuse location?

  • Debbie

    I am a novice at this and trying to buy a used
    Toyota hilux work mate single cab 4×4 – how to I make sure in the ads that I am viewing that it is 4 wheel drive? Not always clear from the description.

Robert Pepper

Robert Pepper

Robert Pepper is the editor of PM4x4, an offroad driver trainer and photographer interested in anything with wings, sails or wheels. He is the author of four books on offroading, and owns a modified Ford Ranger PX which he uses for offroad touring. His other car is a Toyota 86 which exists purely to drive in circles on racetracks. Visit his website: www.l2sfbc.com